STABILIZING THE MENTALLY ILL
AND RETURNING THEIR SELF-WORTH

When mental illness and addictions are treated, people can live full and productive lives.  When they are not treated, it can lead to incarceration (Oklahoma—4th highest rate in the nation*), child abuse, domestic violence, neglect, and suicide (Oklahoma—12th highest rate in the nation**).

*Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2012
**Centers for Disease Control, 2010

MOST OKLAHOMANS WHO NEED TREATMENT FOR MENTAL ILLNESSES DON’T GET IT

Over 60% of Oklahomans who need treatment for depression don’t receive it.* Access to treatment is a problem statewide. “What this means (SAMHSA rankings) is that Oklahoma has the biggest problem of any state in the nation with people struggling with this treatable disease. We have such limited access (to mental illness and substance abuse treatment.)” -- Terri White** (Read Full Story)

*SAMHSA 2013
**Oklahoma Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
Commissioner –
NewsOK televised interview

MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OKLAHOMA (THE ASSOCIATION):  HOUSING, MENTAL HEALTH, AND RECOVERY SERVICES—CATCHING THOSE WHO HAVE FALLEN THROUGH THE IMAGINARY SAFETY NET

True champions of those with mental illness and/or addiction, the Association is making an enormous difference. Its housing and treatment programs are rehabilitating lives that are so broken that many in our society choose to ignore the suffering. Instead, progress that benefits everyone can be shown through the dramatic reduction in chronic homelessness in Tulsa. In 2001, the homeless count was 230; in 2012, the number was 63.* That’s why The William K. Warren Foundation, along with other leading philanthropies, support the Association.

*Mental Health Association Oklahoma's 2013 Annual Report

One person at a time

Learn about "Kevin's" Story

THE FOUNDATION HELPS SUPPORT A HOME FOR "KEVIN"

*Kevin is 23 and legally blind.  He was alone and homeless on the streets for two years.  During that period, he struggled with depression and addiction.  He could no longer qualify to receive Social Security disability checks when he turned 19.  Without a family to rely on, he became homeless.  Kevin didn’t want to be homeless and was able to find a way to link to the Association's housing programs.  With help from caring individuals at the Association, Kevin was empowered to prevent a return to the streets.  Kevin has remained sober and in recovery from mental illness for more than a year now because of the assistance of the Association.

*Mental Health Association Oklahoma's 2013 Annual Report
(name changed for privacy)

FAMILY & CHILDREN’S SERVICES: THE FOUNDATION PROVIDED TREATMENT TO THE SEVERELY MENTALLY ILL WHO ARE IN CRISIS

Through the compassionate people at Family & Children's Services, The William K. Warren Foundation, along with other leading philanthropies, supported the construction of a new CrisisCare Center for the severely mentally ill. These are individuals who are often suicidal, neglecting their children, addicted, and/or contemplating harm to others. They have "lost it." At this Center, in its first 9 months, 1,785* individuals were stabilized in their crises, treated, and returned to their usual lives. The individuals have returned to work, are caring for their children, and are on a pathway to remission and recovery. This Center is making a huge impact on these individuals' lives and on the community as a whole.

*Family & Children's Services, 2014

One Person at a time

Learn about "Rick's" Story

The Foundation Lifts People When They have Hit Rock Bottom

"Rick," (name changed to ensure privacy) 23 years old, was admitted to the CrisisCare Center after what appeared to be a possible first psychotic break as a response to a traumatic event. He presented to the new Center in a catatonic state. He would not speak…paced around and refused to answer questions and was admitted involuntarily. He had to be assisted to eat his food…he had to be directed just to take care of himself. He was admitted to the Center for seven days, and after two days he met with staff and signed consents and smiled agreeing to be there. He started eating on his own. Staff would catch Rick waving from the unit door and smiling. He slowly began joking with staff and after a week was ready to be released. He was linked to Family & Children's Services for outpatient services and remains in a better state and is managing his medications. Rick stopped by his Case Manager’s office the other day "just to let you know how I am doing."

One person at a time

Learn about "Mary's" Story

The Foundation Lifts People When They have Hit Rock Bottom

"Mary," (name changed to ensure privacy) 38 years old, presented to the CrisisCare Center for the first time with suicide ideation and meth dependence. She was initially admitted to the Respite Care Unit but was transferred to the Crisis Stabilization Unit to receive more intensive treatment. Family & Children's Services assisted in getting her back on her HIV medication and into a rehab facility. Family & Children's Services also assisted in mending her relationship with her father. When Mary discharged, her rehab placement fell through and she had a significant relapse. She came back through the Crisis Respite Unit and again was transferred to the Crisis Stabilization Unit for treatment. Family & Children's Services helped her get back on her feet, and she went from the Center to a 30-day rehab program. She has let Family & Children's Services know that she is now sober, caring for her children, and holds a job. She has not needed additional crisis response since getting out of longer-term rehab.